Scott Clark speaks with the Vancouver Sun for a recent Series on the DTES

Last week, the Vancouver Sun published a series looking at the deep and complex challenges facing Vancouver’s DTES. The articles tackle the inadequate coordination of services and funding in the area, the NIMBYism of other communities which results in the ongoing centralizing of services in the DTES, and the need for an innovative and comprehensive strategy that promises real change.

Scott Clark (ED of ALIVE) offers insight into the steps that decision-makers, including all levels of government, funders, and service-delivery agencies, must take to address the current situation. This means developing a new approach based on principles of empowerment and sustainability, reflective of the needs and aspirations of marginalized groups. Like others, ALIVE believes that all 24 Vancouver communities must become more supportive and inclusive of vulnerable individuals and families including low-income and Aboriginal populations. Too often, the traditional silo-segregated model of service delivery results in duplicated efforts and gaps in service at the expense of already vulnerable groups who continue to ‘fall through the cracks’. The place-based model championed by ALIVE is participatory and people-centred, seeking to build upon and connect existing services and programs to offer coordinated, holistic service responses.  Services and resources must be accessible in all neighbourhoods if we are to make any significant progress towards building healthy, vibrant, sustainable communities in Vancouver where everyone is able to claim their right to occupy and use city space.

Scott Clark, head of the native organization ALIVE which is advocating for positive changes in the Downtown Eastside, outside of the Ray-Cam Community Centre.

The articles:

Downtown Eastside: 260 agencies, housing sites crowd Downtown Eastside

Lack of cooperation means homelessness likely to persist on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Pete McMartin: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside is a ghetto made by outsiders

Part three in a series: How are other Canadian cities dealing with homelessness?

The future of the Downtown Eastside: Should they stay or should they go?

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Federal Court of Appeal Ruling Grants Metis the same rights as “Status Indians”

A Recent Ruling by the Federal Court of Appeal has upheld a Federal Court decision that found the Metis have the same rights as Status Indians under the Canadian Constitution. Those who are “non-Status Indian” were not included in the ruling. HANDS UP go to Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP), and especially former leader Harry Daniels (RIP), for their work on this case.

read more from APTN

Report: Young people are leaving aboriginal communities in large numbers, and most have no plans to return

A CBC News article  from April 16, 2014 reports on the challenges associated with the current brain drain affecting Aboriginal communities, as young people migrate to urban centres for education and work opportunities, and other experiences outside of their home communities

Nearly half of urban aboriginal people aged 18 to 24 say they have no plans to return home. Another 33 per cent are undecided”

READ MORE HERE: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/brain-drain-challenges-first-nation-communities-across-canada-1.2611029

Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Campaign

“The Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Campaign (The “ARC”) is an Aboriginal Tourism B.C. (“AtBC”) initiative aimed at promoting and supporting authentic Indigenous artworks in the retail and wholesale marketplace.”

This exciting initiative helps to raise awareness about the economic and cultural value that indigenous arts and crafts hold for indigenous communities and educates consumers about the positive impact of purchasing authentic indigenous arts. When you buy items with the authentic indigenous logo, you know the artist is being fairly compensated.

 

For more information check out the website: http://authenticindigenous.com

 

If you are an artist, you can fill out the online Artist Registration on the Authentic Indigenous Arts website

ALIVE Advocating Aboriginal Representation in DTES Non-profits

In the wake of the media attention surrounding Portland Hotel Society’s financial accountability and leadership issues, Scott Clark (ALIVE ED) talks with the Georgia Straight about what real, meaningful inclusion of Aboriginal people looks like in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.

 “I’ve seen that with so many of these groups in the Downtown Eastside. They tokenize us, they use us for prayers and for openings, and they talk about unceded territory. But when it comes to having a critical aboriginal voice at the table, it’s rare.”- Scott Clark

 

Read full article here

Scott Clark Speaks on CKNW about the Need for a Strategy to Support Aboriginal Youth

Recently, CKNW contacted ALIVE ED, Scott Clark, to hear ALIVE’s thoughts on the recently released report by the BC Child and Youth Rep, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond. In it, Turpel-Lafond presents the case of a 14-year old Aboriginal youth, who, like many others, was failed by a dysfunctional child protection system. Click on the link below to hear Scott discuss how we can re-align the current ineffective framework and coordinate a place-based strategy that will deliver a continuum of support to our most vulnerable youth and ensure that they do not continue to “fall through the cracks”.

Scott on CKNW With Simi Sara

If you’d like to read more about the circumstances of the case, find the original report here

Mother’s Panel on the MCFD

{youtube}OAbuEIdYaio{/youtube}

ALIVE directors Carol Martin, Marilyn McKee, and Melanie Lecoy recently shared their knowledge and experience in dealing with the Ministry of Children and Family Development in a “Mother’s Panel” discussion for ACCESS TV.

 

 

ALIVE Director Carol Martin, a Remarkable Woman

ALIVE Director Carol Martin was recently nominated as a Remarkable Woman in the Vancouver Parks Board series. See the feature here.

Another ALIVE Director, Lorelei Hawkins, was selected as a Remarkable Woman in 2013. See her story here.

ALIVE is extremely lucky to have the guidance of these two (and many more) Remarkable Women.

Former ALIVE president Ambrose Williams continues to fight Northern Gateway Pipeline

Former ALIVE president and youth representative Ambrose Williams is continuing to play a part in resisting the construction of Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline. The pipelines, recently approved by a federal review panel, would cross the traditional territories of Aboriginal peoples and broach pristine forests and waters on its path from Alberta’s oilsands to Kitimat, BC.

Read the full story by Carlito Pablo at The Georgia Straight.