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The North West Indigenous Council: A New Organization to Represent off-Reserve Aboriginal People in BC

The announcement of the North West Indigenous Council (NWIC) is welcome news for off-reserve Aboriginal communities in BC, including the 40,000 urban Aboriginal people living in Vancouver. 

 While there are several provincial Aboriginal groups including the First Nations Summit, Union of BC Indian Chiefs and Assembly of First Nations BC regional chief these organizations are dealing primarily with on-reserve issues.

 Photo by: Wawmeesh G. Hamilton/Metro

According to NWIC president Ernie Crey (also the president of ALIVE):  “what is really missing and is sorely needed is political advocacy for off reserve people”

 The new society will serve as the political voice of BC’s off-reserve Aboriginal population at the municipal, provincial and federal levels of government

Directors will represent the five (5) Regions in the province based on the current First Nations Health Regions 

The constitution and bylaws and other documents were mailed to B.C. Registry Services on Tuesday

Read Wawmeesh G. Hamilton’s coverage of NWIC in the Metro News:  HERE

 

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Our Place Graduation Strategy Launch

On March 4, 2015  a public celebration took place at Ray-Cam Community Centre, marking the formal kick-off of the Graduation Strategy. The event enabled key partners to meet the community and the general public, answer questions, and build overall community momentum to create a neighbourhood where children can thrive. Following the Public Forum, the Community was invited to attend a special performance of “Mistatim”, a Red Sky Production, at the Russian Hall.

Our Place is a collaboration of community organizations, residents,  First Nations, and local businesses, including ALIVE.   Based at Ray-Cam Community Centre,  our comprehensive approach starts with pre-natal care and healthy babies, through to early learning opportunities at local child care centres, and on to youth and family supports through the middle years to secondary school graduation. The Graduation Strategy establishes a holistic approach, working with parents to establish a culture of success in the inner-city.  “Peer support for families is an important element of our comprehensive approach” says Marilyn McKee, president of the Ray-Cam Community Cooperative Association

Check out CBC’s  Coverage of the Graduation Strategy Launch:

CBC’s March 4th Edition of On the Coast featuring an Interview with Scott Clark on the Graduation Strategy 

 

Article: Vancouver Downtown Eastside high school graduation rates under scrutinyCommunity and government organizations joining together to raise graduation rates

Afterwards community members headed to the Russian Hall for dinner and a performance of, Mistatim, a production of Red Sky indigenous theatre, music and dance Company from Toronto 

**Thank you to Dima Alansari for the Photos

 

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ALIVE Board of Directors 2014-2015

We had a great turnout for ALIVE’s 2014 AGM! Thanks to everyone who joined us…

 

 

We are pleased to announce the ALIVE Board of Directors for 2014-2015

 

President: Ernie Crey

Vice President: Penny Kerrigan

Treasurer: Clayton Brown

Secretary: Devon Webster

 

Board Members:

Melanie Lecoy

Carol Martin

Brandon Block

John Skulsh

Rob Morgan

Kwakwee Baker

Marilyn McKee

Bill Lightbown

Lorelei Hawkins

 The evening began with dinner and a screening of “Our Place, Our Children”, a short documentary that follows Caprice, an indigenous youth who suffered a critical crisis in 2012, and the important family figures who supported her through her recovery process.
This film is a collaboration between Caprice and Melanie Rita Lecoy (ALIVE board member), Aboriginal Life in Vancouver Enhancement Society(ALIVE), Our Place, Raycam Community Centre, and Salish Sea Productions. It was well-received by all ALIVE members.

 

 

 

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The Mainlander: 17,000 housing units set to lose their funding in the City of Vancouver

“Only through persistent organizing, and through the building of an anti-displacement movement that includes women, migrants, non-capitalist producers, and unwaged workers, can we challenge models of social housing that presupposes an underlying economy of colonial land ownership, predicated on expropriation and displacement. And only through that movement can we begin the fight for a model of social housing based on social justice, resident control, and the needs of everyone.”

 

Read the article

No silver bullet to fix Canada’s most challenged urban commmunity

Tristan Hopper of the National Post reports on the state of “Canada’s poorest postal code”, citing both ALIVE President, Ernie Crey and Executive Director, Scott Clark in a recent article

Vancouver’s ‘gulag’: Canada’s poorest neighbourhood refuses to get better despite $1M a day in social spending

 

Kim Stallknecht/Postmedia News/File

 

“We’ve made it Fortress Downtown Eastside; easy to get in, exceptionally hard to get out of,” says Ernie Crey, president of the AREA’S Aboriginal Life In Vancouver Enhancement Society (ALIVE).

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ALIVE AGM 2014

Main Business:
1. Review Work Reports

2. Review Financial Position

3. Special Resolution A: That Rule 17 be deleted in its entirety and replaced with the following:
17. A quorum is 10 members present or such greater number as members may determine at a general meeting

4.Special Resolution B : To delete Rule 38 in its entirety and replace with the following:
38. A resolution in writing approved by a majority of the Directors by phone, email and in a meeting of the Directors will as valid and effective as if regularly passed at a meeting of the Directors.

5.Special Resolution C: That a amendment is made to Rule 4 to read:
4. A Full Member will ordinarily be defined as any Aboriginal person (section 35 of the Constitution Act 1982) living in the Vancouver area (Vancouver, Burnaby, and New Westminster) who support the objectives of the Association.
Any person may apply to the Directors or their designate and upon acceptance by the Directors or their designate, the person becomes a member. Membership criteria will be determined by the Directors yearly.
The Directors may accept a non-aboriginal person as a member but such members will not exceed 10% of the total aboriginal membership of the Association.

6. Election of Officers