Scott Clark on Global News Calling for Change at MCFD

“Two weeks after a judge issued a damning ruling against the Ministry of Children and Family Development, calls continue to come for the ministry to do more to help at risk children. Scott Clark, Executive Director of the Aboriginal Life in Vancouver Enhancement Society, and Judy McGuire, coordinator with the Inner City Safety Society, speak to BC1 about what social workers are dealing with on the front lines.”

Link to Global News Coverage

More like this from ALIVE:

 Press Releases 

Mother’s Panel on the MCFD

No silver bullet to fix Canada’s most challenged urban commmunity

Tristan Hopper of the National Post reports on the state of “Canada’s poorest postal code”, citing both ALIVE President, Ernie Crey and Executive Director, Scott Clark in a recent article

Vancouver’s ‘gulag’: Canada’s poorest neighbourhood refuses to get better despite $1M a day in social spending

 

Kim Stallknecht/Postmedia News/File

 

“We’ve made it Fortress Downtown Eastside; easy to get in, exceptionally hard to get out of,” says Ernie Crey, president of the AREA’S Aboriginal Life In Vancouver Enhancement Society (ALIVE).

Scott Clark speaks with the Vancouver Sun for a recent Series on the DTES

Last week, the Vancouver Sun published a series looking at the deep and complex challenges facing Vancouver’s DTES. The articles tackle the inadequate coordination of services and funding in the area, the NIMBYism of other communities which results in the ongoing centralizing of services in the DTES, and the need for an innovative and comprehensive strategy that promises real change.

Scott Clark (ED of ALIVE) offers insight into the steps that decision-makers, including all levels of government, funders, and service-delivery agencies, must take to address the current situation. This means developing a new approach based on principles of empowerment and sustainability, reflective of the needs and aspirations of marginalized groups. Like others, ALIVE believes that all 24 Vancouver communities must become more supportive and inclusive of vulnerable individuals and families including low-income and Aboriginal populations. Too often, the traditional silo-segregated model of service delivery results in duplicated efforts and gaps in service at the expense of already vulnerable groups who continue to ‘fall through the cracks’. The place-based model championed by ALIVE is participatory and people-centred, seeking to build upon and connect existing services and programs to offer coordinated, holistic service responses.  Services and resources must be accessible in all neighbourhoods if we are to make any significant progress towards building healthy, vibrant, sustainable communities in Vancouver where everyone is able to claim their right to occupy and use city space.

Scott Clark, head of the native organization ALIVE which is advocating for positive changes in the Downtown Eastside, outside of the Ray-Cam Community Centre.

The articles:

Downtown Eastside: 260 agencies, housing sites crowd Downtown Eastside

Lack of cooperation means homelessness likely to persist on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Pete McMartin: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside is a ghetto made by outsiders

Part three in a series: How are other Canadian cities dealing with homelessness?

The future of the Downtown Eastside: Should they stay or should they go?

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

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ALIVE Advocating Aboriginal Representation in DTES Non-profits

In the wake of the media attention surrounding Portland Hotel Society’s financial accountability and leadership issues, Scott Clark (ALIVE ED) talks with the Georgia Straight about what real, meaningful inclusion of Aboriginal people looks like in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.

 “I’ve seen that with so many of these groups in the Downtown Eastside. They tokenize us, they use us for prayers and for openings, and they talk about unceded territory. But when it comes to having a critical aboriginal voice at the table, it’s rare.”- Scott Clark

 

Read full article here

Scott Clark Speaks on CKNW about the Need for a Strategy to Support Aboriginal Youth

Recently, CKNW contacted ALIVE ED, Scott Clark, to hear ALIVE’s thoughts on the recently released report by the BC Child and Youth Rep, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond. In it, Turpel-Lafond presents the case of a 14-year old Aboriginal youth, who, like many others, was failed by a dysfunctional child protection system. Click on the link below to hear Scott discuss how we can re-align the current ineffective framework and coordinate a place-based strategy that will deliver a continuum of support to our most vulnerable youth and ensure that they do not continue to “fall through the cracks”.

Scott on CKNW With Simi Sara

If you’d like to read more about the circumstances of the case, find the original report here

Mother’s Panel on the MCFD

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ALIVE directors Carol Martin, Marilyn McKee, and Melanie Lecoy recently shared their knowledge and experience in dealing with the Ministry of Children and Family Development in a “Mother’s Panel” discussion for ACCESS TV.