OneCard is available now!

What is the OneCard?

OneCard is a single card that will provide all Vancouverites with universal access to pools, rinks and fitness centres across the Park Board network and access to the city’s community centres. OneCard replaces the current patchwork of over 20 cards, which includes the Flexipass and the Leisure Access Card.

OneCard can be loaded with any of the Park Board’s Flexipass options and 10-visit passes, and also includes a built-in 50 percent subsidy, for those who qualify, as part of the Park Board’s Leisure Access program for those with financial barriers.

OneCard is free and available to the entire community regardless of income, where you live or which facilities you choose to visit.

Find out more about the new OneCard and the Leisure Access Program for low income residents.

OneCards are available now at all Park Board operated swimming pools, ice rinks and fitness centres, and the Britannia Community Services Centre, Strathcona Community Centre, and Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre.

Vancouver City Council Proclaims its Support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

 

The City of Vancouver has made public its support for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, voting to make June 21st 2013 to June 20th 2014  the Year of Reconciliation in Vancouver. The motion came from Councillor Andrea Reimer in preparation for the fall Truth and Reconciliation event and as a result of dialogue with the city’s Urban Aboriginal Peo

ples Advisory Co

mmittee, whose membership includes two ALIVE board members. Reimer stated that “reconciling past injustice, and strengthening shared understanding and awareness of history, is vital to both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in building a successful future for Vancouver.”

 Reconciliation Canada and the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory Committee are committed to increasing opportunities for dialogue and understanding between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals regarding the experience and rights of indigenous people in Canada. “It’s important that all Vancouver residents build our understanding of the histories, contributions, and persistent challenges faced by Aboriginal people in Canada, and that City Hall continues to strengthen relationships and dialogue with the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tseil-Waututh Nations,” said Mayor Gregor Robertson. “The Year of Reconciliation in Vancouver will provide an opportunity for people of all cultures to en

 

gage in dialogue and work together for a shared future that fully supports the rights and aspirations of aboriginal people living in and around Vancouver.”

“For some people, the residential school experience is unknown,” Reimer told the Georgia Straight “They might have heard the term, but they’re not aware of what it meant…It was a very deeply traumatic and shameful experience in Canada that needs to be dealt with, needs to be acknowledged, needs to be understood, and that we need to move on from collectively.” “Ultimately it’s a trauma…that has reverberations throughout our community, and if we can’t reconcile that and move forward, that’s holding us back, as a society and as a city.”

Urban Aboriginal Peoples Advisory committee: http://vancouver.ca/your-government/urban-aboriginal-peoples-advisory-committee.aspx

Mayor of Vancouver website: http://www.mayorofvancouver.ca/reconciliationyear