hcwitness2-300x225

Michèle Audette in Vancouver

Michèle Audette, president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, was recently in Vancouver addressing the Unifor Canadian Council. ALIVE President, Ernie Crey, and Executive Director, Scott Clark, had the opportunity to meet with Audette to discuss key issues affecting Aboriginal women and urban Aboriginal residents in Vancouver as well as the work of ALIVE and our partners.

Audette has announced that she will be stepping down from the NWAC by the end of the year, as she will be seeking nomination in the Quebec riding of Manicouagan with the Liberal Party. Audette has been outspoken about the need for a national inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women. Her presentation at the Unifor conference can be found here 

Michèle Audette and Scott Clark

Michèle Audette and Ernie Crey

You’re invited to: Kids, Cars and Cops

A Fundraiser for Naskarz!!!

 TICKETS AVAILABLE ON EVENTBRITE: http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/kids-cars-and-cops-tickets-13182869317

Kids, Cars and Cops

When: October 28th, 2014 4:00-6:00 PM 

Where: Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre

NASKARZ is finishing off another great year with a fundraiser at the beautiful Roundhouse Community Centre in Vancouver. Our Kids, Cars and Cops: What could go wrong?  event onOctober 28th, 2014, organized in partnership with Vancouver Police Foundation, hopes to raise $60,000 for the 2015 NASKARZ season. We invite you to join us on this date, celebrate the past successes and support our young people in the future. 

 

Join us for a meet and greet with participants from 4:00 to 6:00pm (all ages); from 6:00pm onwards we are hosting an (adults only) with wine, refreshments, speakers anda Silent Auction!

NASKARZ (Never Again Steal KarZ) is a dynamic program for high-risk youth in Vancouver’s Inner City. Created by the community to deal with the high impact of auto-theft, the program works with youth to provide positive peer support, social activities and the skills  needed to work in the auto mechanics field. Youth who have been involved in auto theft and joyriding work alongside car enthusiasts, kids interested in car culture, police and youth workers to learn the fundamentals of vehicle repair. 

 Charitable Tax Receipts available for donations over $20 from Ray-Cam Community Association #10787 4299 RR0001

New ALIVE Logo by Lou-ann Ika’wega Neel

ALIVE would like to thank Lou-ann Neel for creating this beautiful design, titled ‘In Coast Salish Territory’, to represent our organization and the diverse communities we work with.

Great work Lou-ann!

(Below is an artist statement and bio)

 In Coast Salish Territory

 “In Coast Salish Territory” is an original design created in 2014 by Lou-ann Ika’wega Neel, for the Aboriginal Life In Vancouver Enhancement Society.

 “In Coast Salish Territory” speaks to our diverse communities, as represented by the ‘four stars of the four directions’ that shine brightly in the night sky.

 Two wolves provide protection and guidance to all who roam this land; Sky Spirit Wolf transforms minute by minute, forming the clouds that dance across our coastal communities, keeping our air clean.  Sea Spirit Wolf swims to and fro, creating the hourly tides that grace our coastlines and enable marine life to flourish.  Wolves represent loyalty and strong family ties. Wolves are social and communicative beings, and are very strategic hunters.

 They are integral to the delicate ecosystems that provide us with our homes, our food and our communities, and they protect the mountainous landscape that serves as home to many of our other Original Ancestors.

 Together in a circle of our sacred red cedar bark, these symbols collectively speak to the commitment of the ALIVE Society – to promote, enhance and foster the social, economic, and cultural well-being and health of Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver.

  Lou-ann Ika’wega Neel

 My Kwakwaka’wakw potlatch names are Ika’wega, Kiditl’logw, and Ga’astalaas, and I am from the Kwagiulth, Mamalilikulla, Ma’amtagila, ‘Namgis and Kwickwasutaineuk people of the Kwakwaka’wakw Nation.  My grandmother was Ellen Ka’kasolas Neel (nee Newman), and she spent most of her life here in Vancouver, BC.  When I was invited to submit a logo for consideration by ALIVE, I was very honored, as my grandmother was a full time artist in Vancouver from the early 1940’s until her passing in 1966.

 I am now a full time art-school student and practicing artist residing in Vancouver.  I work with artists and community organizations to promote creative, artistic, and cultural activities across the Lower Mainland, and am pleased to support the good work of ALIVE!

Where Change Happens Panelist Interviews

ALIVE and Salish Sea Productions took the opportunity to interview each panelist at our Where Change Happens- Reconciliation in Action event that took place on June 20th, 2014.

In these short vignettes, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, Dr. Evan Adams and Wendy Grant-John offer insight into the development of sustainable, evidence-based approaches to fostering the health and well-being of the urban Aboriginal population.

 

Scott Clark speaks with the Vancouver Sun for a recent Series on the DTES

Last week, the Vancouver Sun published a series looking at the deep and complex challenges facing Vancouver’s DTES. The articles tackle the inadequate coordination of services and funding in the area, the NIMBYism of other communities which results in the ongoing centralizing of services in the DTES, and the need for an innovative and comprehensive strategy that promises real change.

Scott Clark (ED of ALIVE) offers insight into the steps that decision-makers, including all levels of government, funders, and service-delivery agencies, must take to address the current situation. This means developing a new approach based on principles of empowerment and sustainability, reflective of the needs and aspirations of marginalized groups. Like others, ALIVE believes that all 24 Vancouver communities must become more supportive and inclusive of vulnerable individuals and families including low-income and Aboriginal populations. Too often, the traditional silo-segregated model of service delivery results in duplicated efforts and gaps in service at the expense of already vulnerable groups who continue to ‘fall through the cracks’. The place-based model championed by ALIVE is participatory and people-centred, seeking to build upon and connect existing services and programs to offer coordinated, holistic service responses.  Services and resources must be accessible in all neighbourhoods if we are to make any significant progress towards building healthy, vibrant, sustainable communities in Vancouver where everyone is able to claim their right to occupy and use city space.

Scott Clark, head of the native organization ALIVE which is advocating for positive changes in the Downtown Eastside, outside of the Ray-Cam Community Centre.

The articles:

Downtown Eastside: 260 agencies, housing sites crowd Downtown Eastside

Lack of cooperation means homelessness likely to persist on Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Pete McMartin: Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside is a ghetto made by outsiders

Part three in a series: How are other Canadian cities dealing with homelessness?

The future of the Downtown Eastside: Should they stay or should they go?

 

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

hcshanepointe-272x182

Launch of Talk Healthy City for All

Have you heard about Vancouver’s Healthy City for All Strategy yet? The Healthy City for All Strategy is a framework to work towards a Vancouver where everyone can thrive. 

The City of Vancouver recently launched the “Talk Healthy City for All” engagement process for the Healthy City Strategy. This is your chance to take part and get involved.

The City of Vancouver is asking you to share your bold and innovative ideas for reaching the Strategy’s targets over the next decade – on the online forum, through social media, at in-person ideas labs, or by hosting your own event.

Visit www.vancouver.ca/healthycity4all for more details – watch the video, check out the goals and targets, sign up for a SoapBox account and start posting your best and boldest ideas (and vote, comment and add to others). City staff and the Healthy City for All Leadership Table will be listening.

Plus, you could win a chance to discuss your idea with local and global social innovators at the Social Innovation Exchange Ideas Festival on May 30, or learn additional skills to turn your idea into action with a scholarship to attend the THNK Creative Leadership workshop hosted by FUEL on May 30!

You can also direct your questions to the Healthy City for All team at healthycity@vancouver.ca

 

Federal Court of Appeal Ruling Grants Metis the same rights as “Status Indians”

A Recent Ruling by the Federal Court of Appeal has upheld a Federal Court decision that found the Metis have the same rights as Status Indians under the Canadian Constitution. Those who are “non-Status Indian” were not included in the ruling. HANDS UP go to Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP), and especially former leader Harry Daniels (RIP), for their work on this case.

read more from APTN

Report: Young people are leaving aboriginal communities in large numbers, and most have no plans to return

A CBC News article  from April 16, 2014 reports on the challenges associated with the current brain drain affecting Aboriginal communities, as young people migrate to urban centres for education and work opportunities, and other experiences outside of their home communities

Nearly half of urban aboriginal people aged 18 to 24 say they have no plans to return home. Another 33 per cent are undecided”

READ MORE HERE: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/brain-drain-challenges-first-nation-communities-across-canada-1.2611029

Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Campaign

“The Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Campaign (The “ARC”) is an Aboriginal Tourism B.C. (“AtBC”) initiative aimed at promoting and supporting authentic Indigenous artworks in the retail and wholesale marketplace.”

This exciting initiative helps to raise awareness about the economic and cultural value that indigenous arts and crafts hold for indigenous communities and educates consumers about the positive impact of purchasing authentic indigenous arts. When you buy items with the authentic indigenous logo, you know the artist is being fairly compensated.

 

For more information check out the website: http://authenticindigenous.com

 

If you are an artist, you can fill out the online Artist Registration on the Authentic Indigenous Arts website