Articles and Documents

ALIVE/ OUR PLACE

Reconciliation in Action: A Place-based Approach

Reconciliation in Action Booklet

 

Other Resources:

Environics Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study

Building Aboriginal inclusive communities in Vancouver requires a comprehensive understanding of the values, experiences, identities and aspirations of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples living in our city. A 2010 Environics Institute report, the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study (UAPS), documents the findings of their inquiry into these issues. It also reports on the types of perceptions non-Aboriginal people hold in regards to the Aboriginal population. These findings are based on interviews with a sample of 250 Aboriginal people in Vancouver and 2500 telephone surveys with non-Aboriginal individuals. You can read the full report here and key findings from various cities in Canada here.

The Globe and Mail recently published a piece that summarizes the UAPS findings and reflects on how we can advance the conversation and attend to the diverse needs and interests of the growing urban Aboriginal population in Canada. You can read the article on the Globe and Mail website.

Some findings of the UAPS study:

“Seven in ten Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver think they can make the city a better place to live. This sense of empowerment is stronger than in any other UAPS city except Toronto, and is also stronger than among non-Aboriginal people in Vancouver”

 “There is strong Indigenous pride among Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver”

  “Most UAPS participants feel discrimination of Aboriginal peoples is a pervasive problem, and one that majorities report having experienced personally”

  “A majority of Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver retain links with their community of origin, whether it be their own or that of their parents/grandparents. This sense of connection is particularly strong among First Nations peoples”

 

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Articles and Documents

ALIVE/ OUR PLACE

Reconciliation in Action: A Place-based Approach

Reconciliation in Action Booklet

 

Other Resources:

Environics Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study

Building Aboriginal inclusive communities in Vancouver requires a comprehensive understanding of the values, experiences, identities and aspirations of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples living in our city. A 2010 Environics Institute report, the Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study (UAPS), documents the findings of their inquiry into these issues. It also reports on the types of perceptions non-Aboriginal people hold in regards to the Aboriginal population. These findings are based on interviews with a sample of 250 Aboriginal people in Vancouver and 2500 telephone surveys with non-Aboriginal individuals. You can read the full report here and key findings from various cities in Canada here.

  The Globe and Mail recently published a piece that summarizes the UAPS findings and reflects on how we can advance the conversation and attend to the diverse needs and interests of the growing urban Aboriginal population in Canada. You can read the article on the Globe and Mail website.

  Some findings of the UAPS study:

 “Seven in ten Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver think they can make the city a better place to live. This sense of empowerment is stronger than in any other UAPS city except Toronto, and is also stronger than among non-Aboriginal people in Vancouver”

 “There is strong Indigenous pride among Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver”

  “Most UAPS participants feel discrimination of Aboriginal peoples is a pervasive problem, and one that majorities report having experienced personally”

  “A majority of Aboriginal peoples in Vancouver retain links with their community of origin, whether it be their own or that of their parents/grandparents. This sense of connection is particularly strong among First Nations peoples”

 

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Indigenous Fashion Show and ReMatriate Dialogue at the VPL

In partnership with the Vancouver Public Library, ReMatriate, the Pacific Association of First Nations Women, All My Relations Entertainment and Changemakers Vancouver RISE leader Joleen Mitton organized a spectacular event at the Main Branch of the Vancouver Public Library as part of the VPL’s Multicultural Day Celebration. 

The Shapeshifter Fashion Show became the highlight of the festivities, and unlike anything the library has ever seen before. The show featured a line up of all Indigenous designers and models and ROCKED the VPL promenade. 

Hands up to the designers: Sho Sho Esquiro/ Nadine Spence/ OKA

 Following the show, Rematriate: What To Wear In A Era of Matriation?” invited the whole community to take part in a cultural experience, exploring the depth of creativity amongst notable Indigenous designers, writers, researchers, traditional and contemporary artists, and advocates. Rematriate was a conversation with: Kelly Edzerza Bapty, Beau Dick, Kwiaahwah Jones, and Lisa Charelyboy to raise awareness about the appropriation of Indigenous Cultural Identities.

The event created a space to fuse art, fashion, culture, music and entertainment together to highlight cultural diversity and promote a new path toward equality. Nice work, Joleen, and the rest of the RISE Team who supported this event!

And thank you to the VPL for the use of this beautiful space!

 

{gallery}RISE fashion show{/gallery}